Gil Scott-Heron’s Revolution

Brian Jackson and Gil Scott-Heron in studio, 1973

Brian Jackson and Gil Scott-Heron in studio, 1973 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

There is one thing that grinds me up the wall, and that is when people just go around saying: “The revolution will be televised!”
Sure, it sounds all cool n’ it sounds all “we’ll turn the cameras on you”, but for some reason it doesn’t do justice to the original coined by Gil Scott-Heron.

“The revolution will not be televised”, and you can’t plug in, turn on, and cop out. It’s all right there.
Now I ask you, why would the revolution be televised? Would it be televised on FOX, MSNBC, ABC, HBO, or on MTV?
Would it be televised so you can just watch it happen, comfortable from your own home eating a sandwich saying to yourself:
“Mmhm, yeah I guess I could agree with this change.”

“That song was about your mind. You have to change your mind before you change the way you live and the way you move…The thing that’s going to change people will be something that no one will ever be able to capture on film. It will just be┬ásomething you see and all of a sudden you realize ‘I’m on the wrong page.'”
Gil Scott-Heron on the catchphrase

Now, of course back in the day when Gil Scott-Heron coined the term, it was mostly aimed at the black American.
The American who was born American, but still had to fight for his right to be what he was born to be. I still think that the message he has can be seen as rather universal, it can be expanded and taken to any part of the world, to any culture and to any kind of revolution. Be it of the mind, or another kind.

Maybe some artist prefer to re-invent and televise their revolution, but I find it disrespectful to the original.
In the end that’s just my opinion and I decided to go for a rant blog.
And if you don’t know who Gil Scott-Heron is, shame on you…